Reims – Saint Remi Basilica – buy in Reims

Saint Remi Basilica, about a mile from the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Reims
Saint Remi Basilica, about a mile from the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Reims

Saint Remi Basilica, about a mile from the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Reims, takes its name from the fifth-century Saint Remi — revered as the patron saint of the inhabitants of Reims for more than fifteen centuries. The basilica almost approaches the cathedral in size. Adjacent to the basilica stands an important abbey, formerly known as the Royal Abbey of St Remi. The abbey sought to trace its heritage back to St Remi, while the present abbey building dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries.

The abbey sought to trace its heritage back to St Remi, while the present abbey building dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries.
The abbey sought to trace its heritage back to St Remi, while the present abbey building dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries.

The Saint Remi Basilica dates from the 11th, 12th, 13th and 15th centuries. Most of the construction of the church finished in the 11th century, with additions made later. The nave and transepts, Gothic in style, date mainly from the earliest, the façade of the south transept from the latest of those periods, the choir and apse chapels from the 12th and 13th centuries. The 17th and 19th centuries saw further additions. The building suffered greatly in World War I, and the meticulous restoration work of architect Henri Deneux (fr) rebuilt it from its ruins over the following 40 years. As of 2009 it remains the seat of an active Catholic parish holding regular worship services and welcoming pilgrims. It has been classified as an historical monument since 1841 and is one of the pinnacles of the history of art and of the history of France.

Several royal and archepiscopal figures lie buried in the basilica, but in unidentified graves. They include:

Carloman King of the Franks (751–771; reigned 768–771), the brother of Charlemagne
Queen Frederonne (died 917), wife of Charles III (879–929)
Gerberga of Saxony (910–984), wife of Louis IV (King of Western Francia from 936 to 954)
Henri d’Orléans (died about 1653)
Lothair I, (941–986), King of Western Francia from 954 to 986
Louis IV (King of Western Francia from 936 to 954)

Inside of Basilica St. Remi
The public can visit the abbey building, now the Saint-Remi Museum. The abbey closed in the wake of the French Revolution (the government had all French monasteries dissolved in February 1790). The museum exhibits include tapestries from the 16th century donated by the archbishop Robert de Lenoncourt (uncle of the cardinal of the same name), marble capitals from the fourth century AD, furniture, jewellery, pottery, weapons and glasswork from the sixth to eighth centuries, medieval sculpture, the façade of the 13th-century musicians’ House, remnants from an earlier abbey building, and also exhibits of Gallo-Roman arts and crafts and a room of pottery, jewellery and weapons from Gallic civilization, as well as an exhibit of items from the Palaeolithic to the Neolithic periods.

Another section of the museum features a permanent military exhibition.

Source : wikipedia